• Reading Graphs/ Charts

    Most of us are very familiar with reading graphs and charts. They are mostly self explanatory, once we understand the codes.

    But than it comes to crochet and filet crochet in particular and  we often need to scratch our heads, unravel a lot.

    Typically we are given a key as to what the symbols mean. Usually the chart has empty and filled in spaces.

    When reading a filet crochet chart we start on the bottom and read to the top. We also read from right to left for right sided rows and from left to right for wrong sided rows. In my opinion we might as well learn Hebrew at the same time, because it makes just as much sense. I can usually look at a picture of a pattern and recreate the same thing, especially filet crochet is very easily accomplished from a picture more so than following a chart, since to my non mathematical brain a picture speaks and expresses. A chart or graph is more like a budget: necessary, but uninteresting. Screen Shot 2013-06-29 at 2.15.08 AMScreen Shot 2013-06-29 at 2.15.22 AM

    I am curious how you feel about this

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    When I write my pattern I always use the same abbreviation and the same lingo. The nice thing about digital patterns is, if you leave them on the Ipad or computer, they will always hold their place  as you push a finished row to the end of the screen and start on the next step. If the pattern gets “involved”, which none of my patterns are ( except some classic table clothes), you can pick up a “sticky note” from the computer and keep track of the progress. What I mean by that:

    Let’s say the pattern calls for 3 shells, 5 dc, 6 ch 5 dc, 3 shells , 2 popcorns.

    So you would take a sticky note (note pad) and write all the components like such:

    shell,

     

    shell,

    shell,

    5 dc,

    6 ch

    5 dc,

    shell,

     

    shell,

    shell,

    popcorn,

    popcorn,

    As you execute each stitch you push your sticky pad to the end frame of your iPad or computer at the place you have just completed. that way you hold your place very easily and don’t have to count over and over  to check where you left off. Even when the phone rings, you know exactly where your next move is.

    The way I work is when I have completed that phase of the pattern, in the example done with the last popcorn, I look back what I just did and check if I did it correctly. That way I do not have to notice a mistake after 1 hour of crocheting in the next row. Crochet is just like real life: If you make a mistake, stop in your track, apologize (unravel) and start back on the right way, instead of finding excuses to keep going and screw up more.